Skip to Content

Vietnamese study shows C-reactive protein testing significantly reduces inappropriate use of antibiotics

In the first study to investigate point-of-care CRP in low-income or middle-income countries, tests were provided to 10 primary healthcare centers in and around Hanoi, Vietnam.

Vietnamese study shows C-reactive protein testing significantly reduces inappropriate use of antibiotics

2037 patients presenting with non-severe acute respiratory tract infections were randomly selected to either receive a CRP test or to receive routine care. The results showed a significant reduction of antibiotic use in adults and children who received the CRP test while clinical recovery was the same. There was an overall absolute reduction of 14% in antibiotic use with a high degree of heterogeneity in the effect of CRP point-of-care testing across sites.

The results of this study reflect results observed in studies in Western Europe which also showed that the use of a point- of-care CRP test reduces antibiotic prescribing without negatively affecting clinical recovery.

According to the authors of the paper, “Our findings indicate that the intervention could be applied in the resource-constrained settings of low-income and middle-income countries to improve rational antibiotic use for both children and adults with non-severe acute respiratory tract infection without compromising patients' recovery and satisfaction. Considerable heterogeneity between the ten health-care stations indicates the importance of regular review of any intervention and tailoring it to specific local context.”

Read the full paper here: http://www.thelancet.com/journals/langlo/article/PIIS2214-109X(16)30142-5/fulltext

Explore Related Content and Videos

C. difficile Patient Pathway

Which pathway would you choose for you patient?

Pick a pathway

ITV News Video

ITV News reports on the O'Neill Review and features the point-of-care Alere Afinion™ CRP test being used in primary care.

Webinar

Point of Care C-reactive Protein (CRP) Testing to Safely Reduce Inappropriate Antibiotic Use